Wake Forest University

Magnolias Project - Apply to Participate - Sustainability at Wake Forest

Sustainability at Wake Forest

Magnolias Project – Apply to Participate

Magnolias Project – Apply to Participate

Magnolias Project 2017 – Applications Open

To All Wake Forest Faculty:

We invite you to enhance your teaching and engagement with sustainability issues by participating in the Magnolias Project May 10-11, 2017 on the Wake Forest campus.  No prior experience with sustainability-related issues in the classroom or in research is necessary, and faculty at all ranks and career stages are welcome.

This innovative approach to curricular change, modeled on the nationally renowned Piedmont Project (Emory University), provides faculty with an intellectually stimulating and collegial experience to pool their expertise.  Faculty who would like to develop a new course module or an entirely new course that engages issues of sustainability and the environment are encouraged to apply.

The workshop will explore how we can meaningfully integrate sustainability—broadly defined—into our classrooms.  Although we start by taking a close look at Wake Forest University and the larger Piedmont region, we invite participants to engage in local to global comparisons.

The Magnolia Project kicks off with a two-day workshop (May 10-11) that will offer opportunities to extend research and teaching horizons across disciplines and create new networks with fellow colleagues.  Following the workshop, faculty participants prepare discipline-specific course materials on their own over the summer. They reconvene in the fall to discuss their insights and experiences.  Participants receive a stipend of $500 ($250 upon completion of the workshop; $250 upon completion of a new or revised syllabus).

Project participants agree to:

  1. Read some materials prior to the workshop
  2. Participate in the full 2-day workshop on May 10-11, 2017
  3. Commit time during the summer to prepare or revise a syllabus and submit it in August
  4. Report back to the group in the fall semester

Interested? Applications will be accepted until April 17. 

  • Send a short description (one paragraph maximum) of how you plan to change an existing course, or develop a new one, that will incorporate environmental and/or sustainability issues to Kim Couch at couchkm@wfu.edu.  Please include your name, departmental affiliation, phone number and e-mail address.

Want to know more?

Browse the Magnolias or Piedmont Project websites for example syllabi and faculty statements:

Come join a community of faculty searching for new ways to engage issues relevant to their fields.

Students Overlook Campus Ride-Sharing Network

April 15th, 2017

Zimride, a ride-sharing network, was introduced to Wake Forests’ campus in 2012 as a way to encourage students, faculty and staff to protect the environment and save money. It works to connect drivers and riders who are headed in the same direction through its website or Facebook page.

This ride-sharing network requires a registered Wake Forest email address to sign up. Zimride is economical because it allows drivers to save up to 75 percent on travel costs by splitting a ride with three passengers. Most importantly, the act of carpooling has a major impact on the overall reduction of car pollution, ultimately protecting our environment.

“Since its inception in 2012, we’ve had over 1,100 users and over 1,100 individual rides posted,” said Brian Cohen, the program coordinator for the Office of Sustainability, “That being said, it is undeniable that many people have still not heard of Zimride.”

“I assume that students are unaware of Zimride because they aren’t looking for a ride matching platform,” said Dedee Johnston, the chief sustainability officer. “Sometimes we don’t see things that are clear in sight because we’re not looking for them.”

This idea of not looking for a carpooling network stems from the lack of knowledge regarding its influence on the environment, thus contributing to the refusal to participate in it. 

Sara Cecere, a Greeks Go Green representative, carried out research on the creation of this ride-sharing system.

“In terms of Zimride, only 2.56 percent of those who responded used it or another carpooling app,” she said.  “We found that the biggest barrier to carpooling was that an overwhelming majority (85.71 percent) felt it was inconvenient to coordinate with other people.”

In addition to this, Cecere said that only 2.59 percent of students reported that they believed carpooling reduces carbon dioxide emissions.

This information illustrates the discouraging fact that most people on campus are uninformed about the impact that humans have on our surroundings. In reality, every ride-share works to take away four cars from the road, which is equal to planting about 4,000 trees, according to the Mother Nature Network.

A once-a-week switch to carpooling can decrease a drivers’ carbon footprint by 20 percent.

Considering today’s political climate, our understanding of this data is more important than ever.

On March 28, President Donald Trump signed an executive order to roll back former President Barack Obama’s six-year effort to reduce the effects of climate change and manage carbon emissions. 

Trump believed that Obama’s restrictions on power plants and coal mines only worked to hurt American workers. As a result, he eliminated many government regulations on environmental protection.

While this executive order does not directly pull the U.S. out of the Paris agreement, which commits 196 nations to reducing its carbon footprint to decrease global warming, it puts less pressure on individuals, businesses and the country to accomplish this goal.

This is why awareness is imperative.

“I think if students were more exposed to learning about the impact that they have on the environment, like driving in a car, the more likely they would be to use a system like Zimride,” said junior Mariweir Harris.

There is hope for the future.

“Our Greeks Go Green representatives have also been promoting it within their sororities and fraternities,” Cohen said. “We’ve seen a gradual increase in users, especially before breaks.”

After learning about the ride-sharing network, sophomore, Mitch Dyer, said, “I had no idea [Zimride] existed. If I had known, I would have definitely used it.

“That’s why I believe this is the type of thing that will take off once it becomes a norm on campus,” Cohen said. “But we really need the help of other organizations in reaching more people.”

Originally published in the Old Gold and Black.

Attend the March for Science in Raleigh

April 11th, 2017

The itinerary* posted by the march organizers can be found below.

7:00 a.m.          WFU bus departs from the flagpole outside of the Benson Center
9:00 a.m.          Arrive at Shaw University in downtown Raleigh
9:30 a.m.          Begin lining up for the march
10:00 a.m.        March for Science begins
12:00 p.m.        March for Science concludes at Moore Square
12:00 p.m.        Rally and Science Fair begin
2:00 p.m.          March for Science activities conclude
2:15 p.m.           WFU bus departs from Moore Square
4:30 p.m.          Bus arrives back at Wake Forest University*

Each rider will pay a flat fee of $15 for transportation. By signing up, you will reserve your seat on the bus and also commit to paying the $15 fee (note that cash and check are the preferred methods of payment; make checks out to Wake Forest University).

Seats are limited and will be allocated on a first come, first served basis. Click here to reserve your seat.

Additional information and the full itinerary for the Raleigh March for Science can be found at raleighmarchforscience.org. Email cohenbj@wfu.edu with any questions.

* Itinerary times are subject to change.

Move Out, Don’t Throw Out

April 11th, 2017

Below is a complete description of all donation and reuse stations that make it easy to divert waste from the landfill.

Deacs Donate 

  • What? Reusable house wares, clothing, small appliances, school supplies, furniture, and unopened canned/dried food
  • When? April 28 – May 5
  • How? Smaller items should be placed in blue Goodwill donation boxes located in the lobby of every residence hall. Bulky items (futons, shelving units, bookshelves, rugs, etc.) must be placed next to the “Deacs Donate” sign  in front of each residence hall. Items for Deacs Donate are collected by the Resident Student Association, in collaboration with Goodwill.
  • Why? In 2016, Residence Life & Housing’s Deacs Donate program helped students put over 5 tons of clothing and other essentials into the hands of those in need in the Winston-Salem community.
  • Questions? Contact Elizabeth Leslie (leslieea@wfu.edu) or your RSA advisor. Residents of the Polo Road and Rosedale Circle RL&H Theme Houses should contact their RAs for information on the location of the donation bins in their area.

Recycling Tote Collection

  • What? Small green recycling totes with white handles
  • When? April 28 – May 5
  • How? If you have a personal green recycling tote and do not wish to keep it, place it next to the green recycling bin signs outside you residence hall.
  • Why? Your tote is yours to keep for all four years. If you no longer want it, it will be collected, cleaned, and redistributed to a first-year student next year. Note: you will not receive a replacement tote next year if you choose to give it back.

To-Go Container Collection

  • What? Green to-go containers from Deacon Dining.
  • When? April 28 – May 5
  • How? Return any green reusable to-go containers to the Fresh Food Company to receive your $5 deposit back. If you do not wish to receive your deposit back, please leave your to-go container next to the green recycling bin sign outside your residence hall. For the week of finals, bio-compostable disposable to-go containers will be used in all dining halls.

Donate Textbooks to Better World Books

  • What? Textbooks
  • When? April 28 – May 5
  • How? All books can be deposited in collection boxes located conveniently near the registers in the bookstore textbook department– you don’t even have to wait in line.
  • Why? Students always seem to end up with textbooks that the bookstore just cannot buy back at the end of the semester. Better World Books collects and resells these volumes to fund literacy initiatives at home and abroad. Last year, over 1 ton of books were recovered and donated to partner programs around the world.

Recycle Your Notes

  • What? Class notes and all recyclable paper
  • When? April 28 – May 5
  • How? Recycle loose-leaf notes, class handouts, fliers and other paper and small pieces of cardboard by depositing them in the blue paper recycling bags given to all residents by their RAs. Full bags can be placed next to the blue paper recycling signs outside residence halls.

Donate Your Bike to the Re-Cycle Fleet

  • What? Is your bike looking for a new home? Donate it to Wake Forest’s Re-Cycle Bike Share Program. Donated bikes will be reconditioned and added to the bike share program to increase the number of bikes available to other students.
  • When? April 28 – May 5
  • How? Contact Lee Collette (colletls@wfu.edu/336-758-6046) to schedule a drop-off time at Outdoor Pursuits.

These move-out waste reduction initiatives are sponsored by Residence Life & Housing, Goodwill, Facilities & Campus Services, and the Office of Sustainability.

 

Intern with the Office of Sustainability

April 3rd, 2017

Greeks Go Green
The Greeks Go Green intern will assume leadership of this peer education initiative by holding regular meetings with chapter representatives, recruiting new representatives as needed, organizing monthly presentations and events throughout the semester, and liaising with the Office of Student Engagement. The intern must be an active member of a recognized Greek social or service organization on campus. Excellent collaborative leadership and organizational skills are required.

Campus Garden
The team of Campus Garden interns collaborates with expert garden mentors, as well as faculty, staff, student, and community volunteers, to manage the Campus Garden on Polo Road. Managing this outdoor learning space for sustainable agriculture includes, but is not limited to, developing and maintaining rotation and cover cropping plans, starting and transplanting seasonally appropriate crops, watering, mulching, and composting food/yard waste. Interns coordinate volunteer hours and engage volunteers in conversations about the differences between conventional and sustainable agriculture. In addition, interns explore service learning possibilities with interested faculty, organize major events in the campus garden, and maintain a vibrant and engaging communications plan. The successful candidate will have demonstrated leadership experience in a collaborative team environment.

Summer Campus Garden Manager
The Summer Campus Garden Manager will serve from May through August 2017. Under the direction of Office of Sustainability staff, and with support from professional horticultural staff, this position is responsible for the daily, weekly, and season-long management of a one-acre diversified produce operation. The manager coordinates all aspects of garden production, manages volunteers, facilitates participation by multiple service-related groups, and serves as a public face of the garden to the campus community. Applicants should have experience working in a small-scale agriculture environment and with a variety of age groups. Qualified candidates will have a demonstrated ability to work independently and collaboratively and a passion for garden education. Experience in ecology, community-based agriculture, and/or food justice is preferred. Learn more about the position in the full job description.

Sustainability in Dining
The dining intern will work collaboratively with Deacon Dining staff to promote the sustainability initiatives underway on campus. Reduction of food waste, sourcing local and/or organic ingredients, and emphasizing a plant-forward plate are just a few of the many initiatives advanced through Deacon Dining.

Propose a Unique Internship
Have a great idea for a sustainability-focused internship that’s not listed? Submit a unique internship proposal. We are always looking for new, innovative ways for students to generate sustainability-focused solutions on campus. Your proposal should include an articulation of the need for the proposed project and the landscape of issues surrounding the project.

Apply to Participate in the 2017 Magnolias Project

April 3rd, 2017

This innovative approach to curricular change, modeled on the nationally renowned Piedmont Project (Emory University), provides faculty with an intellectually stimulating and collegial experience to pool their expertise. Faculty who would like to develop a new course module or an entirely new course that engages issues of sustainability and the environment are encouraged to apply.

The workshop will explore how we can meaningfully integrate sustainability—broadly defined—into our classrooms.  Although we start by taking a close look at Wake Forest University and the larger Piedmont region, we invite participants to engage in local to global comparisons.

The Magnolia Project kicks off with a two-day workshop (May 10-11) that will offer opportunities to extend research and teaching horizons across disciplines and create new networks with fellow colleagues.  Following the workshop, faculty participants prepare discipline-specific course materials on their own over the summer. They reconvene in the fall to discuss their insights and experiences.  Participants receive a stipend of $500 ($250 upon completion of the workshop; $250 upon completion of a new or revised syllabus).

Project participants agree to:
  1. Read some materials prior to the workshop
  2. Participate in the full 2-day workshop on May 10-11, 2017
  3. Commit time during the summer to prepare or revise a syllabus and submit it in August
  4. Report back to the group in the fall semester

Interested? Applications will be accepted until April 17.

  • Send a short description (one paragraph maximum) of how you plan to change an existing course, or develop a new one, that will incorporate environmental and/or sustainability issues to Kim Couch at couchkm@wfu.edu.  Please include your name, departmental affiliation, phone number and e-mail address.

Want to know more?

Browse the Magnolias or Piedmont Project websites for example syllabi and faculty statements:

Come join a community of faculty searching for new ways to engage issues relevant to their fields.

Over 115 Participants Team Up to Beautify Campus

March 30th, 2017

Following the ceremony, students divided into groups to plant five trees along the Reynolda Village trail. The trees planted included two redbuds, a small native tree most notable for its rosy-pink flowers; one white oak, a native long-lived, majestic tree; one eastern Hophornbeam, a graceful, native tree with fruit that resembles hops; and one Carolina Silvertree, a native tree that thrives in shady habitats and blooms white bell-shaped flowers in April. Following the planting, the groups collected litter from the banks of the creek head, up into the forested areas above and below the Reynolda Village Trail.

This service event, and our efforts throughout the year to care for our beloved trees, honor our commitment to the ideals that support the Tree Campus USA designation. Event partners included Landscape Services, Residence Life and Housing, Office of Student Engagement, and the Chaplain’s Office. Photos from the event can be found here.

Sustainability Leaders Honored at Annual Campus Awards Program

March 30th, 2017

Wake Forest University Provost Rogan Kersh and Executive Vice President Hof Milam recognized students, faculty, and staff who have demonstrated or initiated successful sustainable practices on campus in the following five categories: Teaching, Research and Engagement; Resource Conservation; Service and Social Action; Bright Ideas; and Leadership.

For the Teaching, Research, and Engagement award category, two individuals were awarded for their work to develop educational and research opportunities that showcase the campus as a living classroom and laboratory. Amanda Lanier was recognized for her focus on sustainability and conservation as the education curator at Reynolda Gardens. Each year, Amanda and her team of volunteers guide over 2,000 school children through the gardens, following a curriculum-based program that focuses on the ecology of the Piedmont. The second award went to Preston Stockton for her leadership on the Reynolda Meadow Project—a 16-acre demonstration site for wildlife protection, watershed protection, and carbon sequestration. The Meadow Project continues to engage the broader community in the important multidimensional research and education underway at Reynolda.

For the Resource Conservation award category, both Facilities & Campus Services and Residence Life & Housing were awarded for their joint work to renovate and renew the Quad residence halls. Over the past two summers, Kitchin, Poteat, and Huffman have all been renovated, resulting in a 20 percent reduction in energy consumption and a 40 percent reduction in water use. With this savings also comes improved indoor air quality and greatly enhanced livability.

Dr. Angela King was honored with the Service and Social Action award for her work to make Enno Farms a model of sustainable practices. Last year alone, over 300 dozen eggs from the farm were sold to Wake Forest faculty, staff, and students. Most recently, Enno Farms partnered with North Carolina Soil and Water to permanently fence livestock from natural water sources—ultimately preventing erosion and ensuring that the local Dan River water basin remains clean.

This year, the Office of Sustainability recognized three Bright Ideas. Lesli Tuttle, of Student Financial Services, was awarded for her marketing strategy to encourage students to obtain their 1098T tax forms electronically. Her innovative campaign saved over 3,400 paper tax forms from being printed and mailed. Steve Fisenne was awarded for his work to successfully develop a chemical inventory system to track hazardous chemicals on campus and to limit duplicate ordering of chemicals among and between departments. During the latest EPA inspection, the university passed an audit by both regional and federal authorities with zero violations—an unprecedented outcome. The final award in the Bright Ideas category went to the Wake Forest Customer and Custodial Services team for their work to make our buildings, air, and environment healthier. To ameliorate the negative environmental and human health effects of wet floor strippers, this team researched and implemented a dry removal method for the annual floor stripping in the residence halls.

Sebastian Irby was awarded this year’s Leadership award for her unprecedented drive in developing the first interdisciplinary undergraduate degree in Sustainability Studies. From mapping a course of study that matches the rigor of established degree programs at peer institutions, to securing commitments from faculty to offer the courses that will fulfill the program requirements at Wake Forest, Sebastian has blazed a trail. Additionally, Sebastian has served as a resource to at least 10 peers who are pursuing their own interdisciplinary paths in sustainability-related areas.

A special award was presented to Sarah Fahmy, a member of the Student-Athlete Sustainability Network, who lead the collaboration between the Office of Sustainability and Athletics to get the student-athlete sustainability network off the ground. A member of the Wake Forest Women’s Track & Field team, as well as the Women’s Cross Country team, Sarah has played in integral role in recruiting and inspiring this group of campus sustainability leaders.

How Valuable are Trees to You?

March 10th, 2017

Celebrate Arbor Day and Tu B’Shevat, the Jewish New Year for Trees, at the Reynolda Village trailhead on March 24 from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. The event kicks off with a tree planting ceremony. Following the ceremony, volunteers will pull up their boots and roll down their sleeves to beautify the woods and creek head surrounding the Reynolda Village trail. Afterwards, all participants will enjoy a cookout featuring grass-fed beef burgers (vegetarian options also included). Register to participate and receive an Earth Week t-shirt and a chance to win prizes for group participation. Other Earth Week events can be found here.

Have you spotted our bright yellow tree tags around campus? Share your photos with us using #CelebrateEarth on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

Beauty in the World We Find

February 27th, 2017

Sunday, March 19 | 300 Link Loot Points
Celebration of Spring: Vernal Equinox
2:00 – 4:00 pm | Campus Garden
Kick off Earth Week by celebrating the Spring Equinox at the Campus Garden. Share and enjoy short stories, poems, essays, and songs about our relationship to spring, growth, beginnings, resistance, and healing. In addition to sharing stories, music, and food, you are invited to express your creativity by painting a banner to showcase your love and appreciation for trees. Student organizations are encouraged to register as groups to paint their banners. All materials will be provided by the Office of Sustainability. Banners will be displayed on the Upper Quad throughout the week-long celebration.

 

Monday, March 20 | 200 Link Loot Points
Bike Tune-Ups
12:00 – 3:00 pm | Green space in front of ZSR
We’ve teamed up with Outdoor Pursuits, Ken’s Bike Shop, and the Cycling Club to host a free bicycle tune-up station on campus. Stop by the green lawn in front of the ZSR Library where bike mechanics from Ken’s Bike Shop will pump up your tires, make minor fixes and adjustments, and offer advice on larger repairs that cannot be done on the spot.

 

Tuesday, March 21 | 400 Link Loot Points
Just Eat It: Waste-Not Cooking Class
4:00 – 6:00 pm | Campus Kitchen Lounge
Don’t toss it — eat it!  Ever wonder whether or not you should eat something after the “best by” date? Learn more about reducing your food waste, while also making a delicious, nutritious meal. Campus Kitchen, Thrive, and the Office of Sustainability are joining forces for a unique cooking class by cooking with food that might normally go to waste. This class is open to all students, staff, and faculty. Register on the PDC website, space is limited.

 

Wednesday, March 22 | 300 Link Loot Points
Campus Sustainability Awards
4:00 pm | Reynolda Hall Green Room
Join us in recognizing the work of those who have enhanced the culture of sustainability within the campus community at the fourth annual Champions of Change: Campus Sustainability Awards ceremony on March 22. Staff, faculty, and students will be awarded for their work in the following categories: resource conservation, academics and engagement, service and social action, leadership, and bright ideas. We look forward to celebrating the work of sustainable change agents across campus. RSVP here.

 

Thursday, March 23
Leadership Project Rally with Donna Edwards
1:30 pm | Johnson and Bostwick lawn
Former Maryland congresswoman and Wake Forest graduate Donna Edwards has spent the last few months on an RV road trip to state and national parks. Her ultimate goal is to raise awareness of parks in communities of color. Students, faculty, staff, and community members are invited to engage with Congresswoman Edwards and learn more about her political life, community activism, and travels on March 23 during a rally on the Mag Quad. Later that day, Edwards will be speaking as part of the Leadership Project at 6:00 p.m.in Farrell Hall’s Broyhill Auditorium. More information can be found here.

 

Friday, March 24 | 500 Link Loot Points
Campus Beautification Day
3:30 – 5:30 pm | Reynolda Village Trailhead
Celebrate Arbor Day and Tu B’Shevat, the Jewish New Year for Trees, at the Reynolda Village trailhead. The event kicks off with a tree planting ceremony. Following the ceremony, volunteers will pull up their boots and roll down their sleeves to beautify the woods and creek head surrounding the Reynolda Village trail. Afterwards, all participants will enjoy a cookout featuring grass-fed beef burgers (vegetarian options also included). Register to participate and receive an Earth Week t-shirt and a chance to win prizes for group participation.

 

Monday, March 20 – Friday, March 24
Get Caught Green-Handed
Throughout the week, individuals who are “caught green-handed” making everyday environmentally conscious decisions will receive a sticker or temporary tattoo. Decisions might include riding bikes, using reusable water bottles, coffee mugs, and shopping bags, taking the campus shuttles, eating at Deacon Dining’s new vegan station, or pledging to reduce energy and water use on campus.

 

Saturday, March 25
Forsyth Creek Week
Saturday, March 25 marks the start of a nine-day celebration of our local waterways. Join in on the fun with Creek Crawls, trail rides, Creek Week trivia, a photography contest and more. Further information about Creek Week, and ways to get involved, can be found here.

 

For questions about the events or other opportunities to engage, contact Ally Hellenga. Follow the Office of Sustainability on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram (@SustainableWFU) to stay up to date on all events.

 

Download the event poster here.

Nominate a Champion of Change

February 11th, 2017

We are seeking nominations for students, faculty, and staff who advance sustainability through:

  • Resource Conservation (energy, water, or waste reduction)
    • Nominations may include projects and efforts that have resulted in energy conservation, water conservation, waste reduction, or a combination of these areas.
  • Academics and Engagement (teaching, research, engaged learning)
    • Nominations may include classes with sustainability-focused learning outcomes, research in sustainability-focused areas, and/or opportunities to learn about sustainability through practical application.
  • Service and Social Action
    • Nominations may include service projects or campaigns that result in social and/or environmental justice outcomes for individuals and the communities served.
  • Bright Ideas (innovative ideas that have been or could be implemented)
    • Nominations may include sustainability-focused projects, efforts, or ideas that are unique and innovative on the Wake Forest campus.
  • Leadership
    • Nominations will include individuals who have empowered others to lead the sustainability transformation.

Nominations will be evaluated based on:

  • The way(s) in which the nominee(s) has/have helped advance one or more of the WFU campus sustainability goals,
  • The level of participation by colleagues within the department or unit, 
  • Measurable impact among constituents across campus or in the community served (students, faculty, staff, and/or community members) and
  • Any additional information or data available to support the nomination.

Self-nominations are accepted. We look forward to hearing about the work of all the inspiring change agents across campus.

Nominations are due by March 3, 2017. The fourth annual Champions of Change award ceremony will be held on March 22 at 4:00 p.m. RSVP here