Wake Forest University

Campus - Sustainability at Wake Forest

Sustainability at Wake Forest

Archive for the ‘Campus’ Category

Meet Wake Forest’s Newest Human-Powered Parking Enforcement Officer

Thursday, April 28th, 2016

kathy_kullman_wfu_sustainabilityWake Forest University’s newest parking enforcement officer, Kathy Kullman, exudes an overall friendly and approachable demeanor. It’s not her appearance or her personality that sets her apart from other parking attendants. The reason is not difficult to pinpoint: she’s human-powered.

Kullman has committed to biking throughout a significant portion of her workday. After previously working as a bicycle patrol officer for a school in California, it was a “no-brainer” when Alex Crist, Director of Parking and Transportation, asked about her preference on biking.

“Having a parking enforcement officer on bike is great for our campus,” says Crist. “We are saving money on fuel, reducing our carbon footprint, and providing an invaluable resource of increased accessibility to our campus community.”

Parking enforcement officers can unfortunately generate negative perceptions at times. Enabling officers to patrol on bike can help break down these barriers and increase engagement with community members. Kullman, who has been on bike for approximately one month, recalls countless positive interactions with students, faculty, and staff while biking. One such interaction involved a faculty member applauding her for her efforts.

“Being on bike has provided a wonderful opportunity to take on the role of liaison for the Department of Parking and Transportation, and for Wake Forest University,” says Kullman. “It’s easy to miss things while I’m in a vehicle, such as a lost wallet lying on the ground or a potential safety hazard. Being on a bike allows me to spot items like this more easily.”

Kullman also believes doing her job on bike “sets a great example for living a more sustainable lifestyle and provides a great way to stay in shape.” Kullman currently spends approximately half of her shift on bike and half in a vehicle, but with the weather becoming nicer–it’s her goal to be on the bike 99% of the time.

Matthew Burczyk, Bicycle and Pedestrian Coordinator for the City of Winston Salem Department of Transportation, completed a shortened version of the League of American Bicyclists safety course with Kathy prior to her time spent on the bike. He discussed and demonstrated important safety issues and techniques to better prepare her for bicycle patrol shifts.

“I commend Wake Forest for taking the lead on this initiative, and encourage the city as well as other local colleges to do the same,” says Burczyk. “Between this and the campus-wide bike sharing program, Wake Forest is quite exemplary in enhancing our mission of encouraging active forms of transportation.”

The Office of Sustainability coordinates the Re-Cycle bike-sharing program, which enables students, faculty and staff to borrow a bike at no cost for either semester-long or short-term use.

Reduce Waste at Move-Out

Tuesday, April 26th, 2016

20100614donate4472Did you know… that the big green dumpsters in front of residence halls are headed to the landfill? Help us keep all reusable or recyclable items out of the dumpsters and in the hands of those who can use them.

Spread the word about these opportunities:

 

Deacs Donate

What? Reusable housewares, clothing, small appliances, school supplies, canned/dried food and furniture

When? April 29 – May 8

How? Smaller items can be placed in blue Goodwill donation boxes in the lobby of every residence hall. Bulky items (futons, shelving units, bookshelves, rugs, etc.) can be taken out in front of each residence hall and placed next to the Deacs Donate sign. Residents of theme houses should contact their resident advisers for information about the location of the donation bins in their areas.

Why? In 2015, the program helped students put approximately 20,000 pounds of clothing and other essentials into the hands of those in need in the Winston-Salem community.

 

Better World Books

What? Textbooks (and any books less than 10 years old)

When? April 29 – May 19

How? All books can be deposited in collection boxes located conveniently near the registers in the bookstore textbook department. You don’t even have to wait in line.

Why? Even if the bookstore can’t buy back your books, they have value to someone. Better World Books collects and resells these volumes to fund literacy initiatives at home and abroad. Those books that cannot be resold are donated directly to partner programs around the world.

 

Recyclable Waste

What? Paper, cans/bottles, cardboard

When? April 29 – May 8

How? Recycle paper, cans, bottles, and cardboard by depositing them in the blue bags given to all residents. Bags can be placed next to the BLUE recycling signs outside residence halls.

Why? Recycling reduces waste and strengthens the circular, closed-loop economy.

 

Recycling Tote Collection

What? Small green recycling totes with white handles

When? April 29 – May 8

How? If you have a personal green recycling tote and do not wish to keep it, place it next to the GREEN recycling bin signs outside residence halls.

Why? Your tote is yours to keep for all four years. If you no longer want it, it will be collected, cleaned, and redistributed to a first-year student next year. Note: you will not receive a replacement tote next year if you choose to give it back.

 

FAQ: Recycle Bins and Totes

Friday, March 18th, 2016

Q. How do I get a desk-side recycling bin for my office?

A. The Reynolda campus transitioned to desk-side recycling collection for faculty and staff in the spring of 2015. Small blue bins labeled with “Paper, Cans, Bottles” stickers are available for pick-up in the Office of Sustainability. Any desk-side bin with a “Paper, Cans, Bottles” sticker will be regularly emptied by Reynolda campus custodial staff. Larger bins for copy rooms, conference areas, or hallways can be ordered through the Office of Waste Reduction and Recycling.

Q. How do I get a green recycling tote for my Residence Hall room?

A. Green recycling totes are distributed during move-in to all first-year students. Students are encouraged to keep their recycling totes for the duration of their time at WFU. The Office of Sustainability keeps a few totes in Reynolda Hall – Room 101 for students who need replacements. Students who return totes during move-out are not guaranteed replacements in the following year. Totes that are returned during move-out are cleaned and redistributed to new students during move-in.

Re-Cycle Bike Sharing Program Challenges Car Culture on Campus

Thursday, March 17th, 2016

It was February 9, 2016 and the area in front of Benson University Center was filled with close to 100 bikes. In a matter of hours, all bikes had been reserved for semester-long use at no cost to students, faculty and staff.

Re-Cycle-Bike-SharingImplementing a free bike-sharing program on a college campus was no easy feat. But behind every successful initiative is an inspired change agent who made it happen—conducted surveys, did the research, identified the means, and converted inspiration to action. Alyshah Aziz, a Politics and International Affairs major from the class of 2016, was that person for Wake Forest University.

It began with CHARGE—WFU’s ten-week leadership development program for first and second-year students. In 2013, Aziz and her group members identified a problem with current modes of transportation in the campus community. Single occupancy vehicles impact roadways, air pollution, health and the greater environment. In an effort to encourage more sustainable transportation modes, they proposed a bike-sharing program for students, faculty and staff. However, when they presented this idea to the WFU Office of Sustainability, they discovered it wasn’t the first time such a program had been proposed. The problem had been implementing the idea. Was there sufficient demand for this program? How would it be funded? Who would manage it?
The ten-week CHARGE program came and went, but Aziz’ passion remained ignited. She applied for a unique internship with the Office of Sustainability to continue the investigation and was accepted. Her initial work included a robust study of demand on campus, including evaluation of price sensitivity among potential user groups.

The tipping point that led to the initiation of the program was the discovery that more than a hundred bikes were abandoned on campus every summer. The organization that had been the recipient of the abandoned property in the past could not use any more bikes. With one solution to two problems in hand, Aziz engaged a variety of other campus offices and organizations to initiate a plan. She partnered with the WFU Cycling Team, Outdoor Pursuits, and University Police to collect and restore 65 usable bicycles that were abandoned on the WFU campus following the 2015 spring semester.

August 2015 marked the pilot program for Re-Cycle, named for the re-use of bicycles that were previously abandoned. To meet unmet demand from the first semester, the Office of Sustainability, WFU Student Activities Fund and the Office of Wellbeing provided financial support to purchase 45 new bikes for the spring semester program. As of February 2016, all bikes had been reserved and over 200 individuals had expressed interest in the program since its pilot.

All WFU students, faculty and staff are eligible to participate in the Re-Cycle bike-sharing program, and there is no cost to borrow a bike. Individuals may reserve a bike for semester-long or short-term use at Outdoor Pursuits. The wait-list for semester-long rentals continues to grow as the program gains popularity. Aside from enabling a free and more sustainable alternative to driving, Re-Cycle also supports the physical well-being of the campus community.

“I hope this program inspires students, faculty and staff to think differently about the way they get from one location to the next,” says Aziz, who will graduate this May. “It’s not easy to influence car culture, and the Re-Cycle bike-sharing program is an important milestone in doing just that.”

In reflecting on the successful launch of this initiative, Dedee DeLongpre Johnston, the campus Chief Sustainability Officer, offered “It’s difficult to estimate how many students come to us each year with ‘good ideas.’ It’s far easier to count those who bring their ideas to fruition. Alyshah’s commitment to execution and professionalism in everything she does is inspiring.”

Farrell Hall Receives LEED Gold Certification

Tuesday, March 15th, 2016

Farrell Hall, the 130,000 square-foot home to Wake Forest University’s School of Business, recently received LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Gold certification.

Farrell-Hall-LEED-Gold

Photo Courtesy of the WFU School of Business

Among the strategies that contributed to Farrell Hall’s Gold-level certification is its inclusion of Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified wood paneling and regional materials. Almost 30% of the building materials by value were manufactured within 500 miles of the project site. More than 80% of on-site generated construction waste from the project was diverted from landfills. The incorporation of bicycle storage facilities also encourages alternative transportation.

One of the most notable features of the building is its open floor plan with classrooms, offices and social spaces on every floor—an intentional design aspect that encourages faculty-student interaction. Before Farrell Hall’s opening in 2013, School of Business faculty, staff, undergraduates and graduates were housed in two separate buildings on the Reynolda campus.

“Farrell Hall was designed to be an innovative space from the ground up. Our aim was to provide a remarkable home for our school, without compromising our commitment to sustainability. Our open, collaborative environment fosters business education and encourages engagement between faculty, staff and students,” said Charles Iacovou, Sisel Distinguished Dean of the School of Business. “Achieving LEED Gold certification places the School of Business in excellent company at Wake Forest.”

Georgian-style façades facing east, north and south feature Wake Forest’s classic Deacon Blend brick. The building’s modern, glass-covered west side is shaded by a loggia and overlooks a terrace surrounded by a wooded lawn. A minimal number of trees were removed for the project’s construction. “Farrell Hall was sited and organized to take advantage of an existing grove of mature pin oak trees,” said Marek Turzynski, LEED Accredited Senior Associate at Robert A.M. Stern Architects, who served as the firm’s project manager for Farrell Hall.

All new buildings on Wake Forest’s campus are designed to meet a minimum LEED Silver standard. Farrell Hall was made possible by a generous gift from Mike and Mary Farrell in 2010, broke ground in 2011, and opened its doors to students in July of 2013. Prior to any project receiving certification from the US Green Building Council, a post-occupancy performance verification is required. The process to certify projects isn’t quick, as “commissioning of building systems is a complicated process,” explained Turzynski. “A lot of documentation has to be compiled and verified.”

Farrell Hall features 18 total classrooms, 16 of which have natural light—a contributing factor in decreasing energy usage. The building can house 1,250+ students and features office/work areas for 170 faculty and staff. Click here to learn more about Farrell Hall.

Update 3/10/16

Thursday, March 10th, 2016

Two Poplar trees will be removed due to a sight line obstruction at the drive to the Arnold Palmer Golf Complex. The removal will take place as early as the afternoon of Thursday, March 10, 2016. Additionally, the McCreary Field House construction site excavation has damaged the root systems of six Virginia Pines, causing them to be a risk to the OS1 building. For removal dates, please contact Wendy Wooten at (336) 758-5689.

Poplar-trees-update-march-10-2016

Two Poplar Trees

 

Six Virginia Pine Trees

Six Virginia Pine Trees

Update: 12/15/15

Tuesday, December 15th, 2015

During the week of December 21st, a large Red Oak that has died will be removed along Wake Forest Road. The tree is located between the Reynolda Road entrance and the entrance to Byrum Welcome Center. The use of a crane will be required; this may disrupt traffic flow.

 

Update: 12/03/15

Thursday, December 3rd, 2015

FullSizeRender (1) (1)A portion of the shrubs at the Northwest corner of the practice football fields will be removed on December 3rd. The removal includes Sasanqua Camellias and Burning Bushes. The removal is necessary to facilitate utility work at the site on December 7th.

A full renovation of the practice football fields will require the removal of the current landscaping adjacent to the full length of the current fields. The remainder of the landscaping, including the ‘Nellie Stevens’ Hollies along Wingate Road, will be removed in January 2016.

Following the renovation of the fields, a 5-foot sidewalk will be constructed along the east side of Wingate Road to increase pedestrian flow. A four to five-foot landscaped area will separate the sidewalk from an eight-foot tall ornamental metal fence.

For information regarding the renovation of the practice football fields, contact Senior Project Manager Wendy Wooten at wootenwr@wfu.edu.

Update: 09/21/15

Monday, September 21st, 2015

A variety of Oak tree species were afflicted with Oak Wilt, died, and then removed from campus. Oak Wilt is a fungus spread by insects for which there are no known treatments. Oak trees were removed from Allen Easley Street,  the Byrum Welcome Center vicinity,  the Presidents House, and Reynolda Village.

Update: 07/06/15

Monday, July 6th, 2015
  • The roses across from the WFU Reynolda Entrance are infected with Rose Rosette Disease. Since there is no treatment for this virus, the plants will be removed.
  • Invasive shrubs along the Village Trail will be mechanically removed in early July. Mechanical removal reduces the use of pesticides. Use of the trail should be minimally impacted.
  • Per the tree care plan, two trees at Graylyn and two trees on campus are dead and must be removed.