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Sustainability at Wake Forest

Archive for the ‘Campus’ Category

Update: 07/06/15

Monday, July 6th, 2015
  • The roses across from the WFU Reynolda Entrance are infected with Rose Rosette Disease. Since there is no treatment for this virus, the plants will be removed.
  • Invasive shrubs along the Village Trail will be mechanically removed in early July. Mechanical removal reduces the use of pesticides. Use of the trail should be minimally impacted.
  • Per the tree care plan, two trees at Graylyn and two trees on campus are dead and must be removed.

Tree removal near SFAC

Tuesday, June 16th, 2015

sfac poplarOn Monday, June 15th, a Poplar tree was removed near Scales Fine Arts Center. A new pipe installation under Wake Forest Road required exposed root removal. The tree was also on the bank of a creek, so the root system on the creek side was exposed and undermined by erosion. Both factors made the tree a high risk for blow over.

Tree removal at Worrell

Monday, June 15th, 2015

Damaged tree WorrellDuring the week of May 25th a Red Maple tree was damaged at the HES construction site. These wounds, at a minimum, will cause a column of decay and weaken the tree. The tree will be removed in the near future. A suitable replacement will be chosen and planted during the landscaping phase of the project.

Tree removal at Kitchin Hall

Thursday, May 7th, 2015

During the week of May 11th, trees will be removed from the Kitchin Hall courtyard as part of the renovation project beginning there. After the renovation of the residence hall, new landscaping will be incorporated as part of the overall design.

Kitchin trees

Tree removal at Spry soccer stadium

Friday, April 24th, 2015

On Monday, April 20th, 18 Virginia Pine trees were removed along the perimeter of Spry soccer stadium as part of the grounds restoration plan for the stadium. Removal of the pines allows for increased light filtration onto the soccer field resulting in healthier turf grass. Deciduous trees exposed by this removal, including red and willow oaks, will now provide the backdrop to the stadium.

Before and after Virginia Pine removal

Before and after Virginia Pine removal

In addition, an oak tree near the Byrum Welcome Center died and has been removed. It will be replaced later this year.

dead oak byrum

Dead oak at Byrum Welcome Center was removed

Arbor Day & Campus Beautification Celebration

Friday, April 10th, 2015

Celebrate Arbor Day on Thursday, April 16th from 4:00-6:00pm. The event kicks off with a tree planting ceremony behind Huffman Residence Hall at 4:00pm.

Following the ceremony, volunteers will split into groups to beautify the campus. All participants will enjoy a cookout featuring Grayson Natural grassfed burgers. Registration is encouraged, but not required.

This event is sponsored by Greeks Go Green, Landscaping Services, and WFU Residence Life & Housing.

Landscaping Update: Winter Jasmine

Tuesday, March 3rd, 2015

jasmineDuring spring break, campus landscaping services will be doing some work on the west side of Wait Chapel near parking lot A.  The slope on this side of the chapel is covered with Winter Jasmine that has become overgrown and has expanded beyond its intended beds.  Some of the Winter Jasmine will be removed and replaced with sod near the Huffman Residence Hall loading dock.  The rest will be cut back to encourage new, healthy growth.

New Halls Bring Home Silver

Wednesday, February 18th, 2015

Magnolia_DogwoodOptimized energy performance may seem like a dry topic, but it’s one of the features that earned Magnolia and Dogwood residence halls and North Dining Hall LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Silver certifications this semester. Undergraduate residents have occupied the residence halls since fall 2013. North Dining Hall welcomed students in January 2014. Prior to receiving certification from the US Green Building Council, however, each required post-occupancy performance verification. All new buildings on campus are designed to meet at least LEED-Silver standards.

The buildings include hi-tech occupancy sensor lights, an interactive energy and water usage dashboard, and low- flow plumbing fixtures. Natural light and high performance lighting in the buildings also decrease energy usage.

Learn more about some of the sustainable features from the LEED scorecards for MagnoliaDogwood, and North Dining Hall.

Holiday Setback Program

Monday, January 26th, 2015

ThermostatThink you were the only one resting this holiday break?

Think again.

This past winter holiday break marked the seventh year Wake Forest has participated in the “Holiday Setback” program, during which we allow electrical use and steam production a bit of a holiday break—conserving both money and energy.

The energy savings during this 2014 winter break is estimated at $32,648; electrical savings were $28,436 (475,840 kWh) and natural gas savings were $4,212 (842 dT).

All seven holiday setbacks total to savings of $274,143.

This is one of the many examples of how sustainable practices are a great idea not only for the planet but also for our budgets.

By Andrea Becker (’16), Staff Writer

Tree Removed in Lot P

Wednesday, January 7th, 2015

cherry tree webA weeping cherry tree on the island in the middle of parking lot P on the east side of Wait Chapel was removed on January 6. The tree, which was part of the original campus planting plan, split down the trunk, rendering it unsalvageable.

This tree will be replaced with the original varietal Weeping Higan Cherry (Prunus subhirtella ‘Pendula’). A description of this tree states that it “grows 20 to 30 feet tall and spreads 15 to 25 feet in a graceful weeping habit. Leaves stay glossy green throughout the summer and into the fall when they turn a vivid yellow before leaving the tree bare in winter. The drooping bare branches even lend a soothing grace to the landscape in winter. There is nothing quite like the Weeping Higan Cherry in full bloom in the spring. The light pink (almost white), one-inch-diameter flowers cover the branches before the leaves emerge, giving the appearance that fresh snow has fallen on the tree.”