Parking enforcement officers can unfortunately generate negative perceptions at times. Enabling officers to patrol on bike can help break down these barriers and increase engagement with community members. Kullman, who has been on bike for approximately one month, recalls countless positive interactions with students, faculty, and staff while biking. One such interaction involved a faculty member applauding her for her efforts.

“Being on bike has provided a wonderful opportunity to take on the role of liaison for the Department of Transportation and Parking, and for Wake Forest University,” says Kullman. “It’s easy to miss things while I’m in a vehicle, such as a lost wallet lying on the ground or a potential safety hazard. Being on a bike allows me to spot items like this more easily.”

Kullman also believes doing her job on bike “sets a great example for living a more sustainable lifestyle and provides a great way to stay in shape.” Kullman currently spends approximately half of her shift on bike and half in a vehicle, but with the weather becoming nicer–it’s her goal to be on the bike 99% of the time.

Matthew Burczyk, Bicycle and Pedestrian Coordinator for the City of Winston Salem Department of Transportation, completed a shortened version of the League of American Bicyclists safety course with Kathy prior to her time spent on the bike. He discussed and demonstrated important safety issues and techniques to better prepare her for bicycle patrol shifts.

“I commend Wake Forest for taking the lead on this initiative, and encourage the city as well as other local colleges to do the same,” says Burczyk. “Between this and the campus-wide bike sharing program, Wake Forest is quite exemplary in enhancing our mission of encouraging active forms of transportation.”

The Office of Sustainability coordinates the Re-Cycle bike-sharing program, which enables students, faculty and staff to borrow a bike at no cost for either semester-long or short-term use.