Wake Forest University

2014 Earth Day Fair - Planetary Wellbeing - Sustainability at Wake Forest

Sustainability at Wake Forest

2014 Earth Day Fair — Planetary Wellbeing

2014 Earth Day Fair Poster-0001Celebrate Earth Day with the Office of Sustainability at the 2014 WFU Earth Day Fair on Tuesday, April 22nd!

The celebration will begin in the Reynolda Hall Green Room at 4:30pm with the inaugural Champions of Change awards ceremony. Immediately following the awards program, the fair will kick-off at 5:00pm on Manchester Plaza (a.k.a. the Mag Quad).

Join us any time between 5:00 and 8:30pm for live music, entertainment, food, and activities. The first 150 participants will receive a free Love the World You’re With t-shirt made by TS Designs. Everyone who attends will have the opportunity to enter to win some of the great prizes listed below.

And, yes, you will get to pet a pony.

 

Entertainment and engagement: MomentumThe Hobbs SistersWake Radio, Monkey Hooper, yoga, tai chi, meditation, and more.

Confirmed exhibitors and vendors to date (don’t  forget your wallet):

Earth Day Fair raffle prizes, generously donated by the respective businesses:

Author Offers New Approach To Climate Change

October 23rd, 2017

The book Drawdown serves “to map, measure and model the most substantive solutions to climate change and bring those solutions and the answers that we’ve uncovered to life,” Wilkinson said in her presentation.

Wilkinson was brought to Wake Forest to present various ways in which everyone, including Wake Forest students, can participate in the movement to reverse the effects of climate change.

Drawdown functions as a handbook that presents 100 solutions to climate change, specifically focused on reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the atmosphere. Eighty of the solutions have been proven effective and scaled, while 20 solutions are considered ‘coming attractions,’ as these solutions are currently being tested.

Each of the solutions are ranked in terms of how much carbon dioxide they would reduce within practice. In addition to rankings, the solutions are presented alongside their cost of implementation and operational savings. By providing figures, Wilkinson adds an economic perspective to the topic of sustainability.

Emma Hughes, a Wake Forest mathematical economics major and environmental studies minor said the economic element “adds value for someone who doesn’t care as deeply about the environment.”

Wilkinson’s interdisciplinary approach to climate change is a product of her education and prior work experiences. She received her bachelor’s degree in Religion from Sewanee and a Doctor of Philosophy degree in Geography and Environment from Oxford. Prior to working at Project Drawdown, Wilkinson worked in various consultancy firms, taught at Oxford and worked for the Natural Resources Defense Council.

Before Drawdown, Wilkinson published her first book, God & Green: How Evangelicals Are Cultivating a Middle Ground on Climate Change, in 2012. This book was a product of her research at Oxford.

Sebastian Irby, a Wake Forest senior who created her own interdisciplinary sustainability studies major with a focus in climate change, has worked within the Office of Sustainability throughout her time at Wake Forest. This event was sponsored by the Office of Sustainability, Center for Energy, Environment and Sustainability, Office of the Dean of the College and Sustainability Graduate Programs. Additionally, Irby is referencing Wilkinson’s God & Green as a resource as she prepares her senior thesis.

“This is in a lot of the circles that I run in daily,” Irby said in the auditorium before the event had begun.

Within Wilkinson’s top 20 solutions, the most represented areas of impact include various solutions centered around food, energy and land use.

Wilkinson concludes by emphasizing the multi-dimensional benefits to her mission, “One of the things that becomes clear when you come through the lens of solutions, is that — yes, these are ways to address greenhouse gases, great … they’re also the means of building a more vibrant and equitable and prosperous and resilient world where people are healthier and happier.”

Originally published in the Old Gold and Black.

The Age of Consequences – Screening & Discussion with Producer Sophie Robinson

October 12th, 2017

Following the screening, the film’s executive producer, Sophie Robinson, will lead a discussion.

The event will begin at 5:00 pm on Wednesday, November 1, in the Pugh Auditorium at the Benson University Center. Admission is free and seats are limited.

Environmental Wellbeing: How Facilities Management Impacts Climate Change

October 4th, 2017

  • Refrigerant management (1)
  • Rooftop solar (10)
  • District heating (27)
  • Solar water (41)
  • Heat pumps (42)
  • LED lighting (44)
  • Building automation (45)
  • Home water saving (46)
  • Recycled paper (70)
  • Retrofitting (80)

MATERIALS: Common Techniques and Technologies to Close the Loop

Refrigerant management is the top Drawdown solution. So, what is refrigerant management, and why is it important? Every refrigerator and air conditioner in existence contains chemical refrigerants that allow us to keep things cool. Up until recently, refrigerants such as chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) were key culprits in in depleting the stratospheric ozone layer. Upon discovery of their damaging effects, CFCs and HFCs were slowly phased out. Nevertheless, refrigerants continue to cause problems for our planet. Ninety percent of refrigerant emissions are created at the point of disposal, and without proper management of refrigerant waste, resultant emissions can be detrimental. In 2016, officials from more than 170 countries enacted the Kigali Deal, a mandatory agreement with specific targets and timetables for phasing out HFCs. It is estimated that the accord will reduce global warming by nearly one degree Fahrenheit. With the Kigali Deal in place, as well as additional safety measures for managing existing refrigerants, we may draw down carbon emissions by nearly 90 gigatons.

How does Wake Forest play its part in refrigerant management? Mike Draughn, Director of Maintenance & Utilities Services with Facilities & Campus Services (FACS), says that FACS partners with the university’s Department of Environmental Health & Safety to administer an all-encompassing, campus-wide program. “Basically, campus is treated as a giant balloon, and we try to measure any escaped refrigerants given both type and asset—the equipment from which it came.” Draughn states that FACS works to quickly identify and fix or replace any equipment that has a refrigerant leak or is at the end of its life. When appliances are discarded, refrigerant is either sold back to the installing contractor and reclaimed (for large items such as chillers), or is removed on campus and collected in warehouse recycling containers (for smaller equipment). “We always report a draw or deposit of inventory on any refrigerant that was either used or recycled and added to refrigerant storage in our warehouse. In terms of replacing and renewing appliances, we update and choose equipment based on a review of the most current, efficient, and environmentally-friendly refrigerant options.”

Wake Forest is also committed to Drawdown solution number 46—home water saving. If 95 percent of taps and showerheads are converted to low-flow options by 2050, we would avoid 4.6 gigatons of carbon emissions. According to Doug Ecklund, the Building Systems Manager for WFU FACS, we have seen a 45 percent increase in water savings as new buildings on campus are renovated and equipped with low-flow shower and water fixtures, as well as dual-flush toilets.

ENERGY: Planning for the Transition

One technology with which many are familiar is rooftop solar. First tested in 1884, solar capture technologies have become mainstream over the years and have seen increases in both affordability and effectiveness. If rooftop solar can grow from 4 percent of global electricity generation to 7 percent by the year 2050, we can avoid 24.6 gigatons of carbon emissions. There are several demonstrations of solar photovoltaic (PV) technology on campus: on the Barn, Reynolda Gardens greenhouse, and North Dining. To make a meaningful transition to solar PV, Wake Forest would need about 20 acres of panels. A changing regulatory environment in the state might release some of the current constraints on this transition.

The Barn was the first building on campus to feature solar electric PV cells.

Solar energy can also be used to heat water. Creating hot water for showers, washing dishes, and cleaning laundry makes up 25 percent of residential energy use worldwide. If solar water heating grows from 5.5 percent to 25 percent by the year 2050, we can draw down carbon emissions by 6.1 gigatons. This is currently the most cost effective application of solar technology on campus. South Hall’s water is heated by solar. Additionally, in phase three of the Reynolds Gym renovation, solar will be installed as a source of heating for the water for the pool.

BUILDINGS AND CITIES: Innovation in Our Urban Habitat

In terms of regulating the temperature of buildings in urban spaces, district heating is the way to go. Rather than having small heating and cooling units in each building, district heating entails funneling steam and/or chilled water from a central plant across a network of pipes to a variety of different buildings. By replacing stand-alone water and space-heating systems that currently exist with district heating techniques, we could draw down carbon emissions by 9.4 gigatons by 2050.

John Shenette, Wake Forest’s Associate Vice President for FACS, believes that the WFU campus is a great example of district heating. From the main Facilities plant, steam and chilled water are distributed to campus buildings through underground ducts to heat and dehumidify, through cooling, indoor spaces. “Wake Forest has invested a good deal of money into improved automation and controls,” says Shenette, “And for good reason—district heating and cooling is much better than individualized units in terms of efficiency.”

Building automation systems (BAS) are becoming very common in the commercial sector. In a building with a BAS, a centralized, computer-based “brain” monitors and controls all mechanical functions in order to operate under the greatest level of efficiency and effectiveness. If BAS usage expands from 34 percent of commercial floor space to 50 percent by the middle of the 21st century, we could draw down 4.6 gigatons of carbon and generate a large savings in operational costs. BAS exist in most campus buildings here at Wake Forest. The campus makes great use of occupancy sensors that adjust lighting and control heating and cooling by detecting the presence of someone in a room. There are also sensors to determine bathroom exhaust fan speeds according to occupancy and to detect the need for certain amounts of hot water. Over the past few years, the implementation of such controls has resulted in a 20 percent decrease in electricity usage on campus.

One efficiency solution that is easily recognizable from residential buildings and other locations across campus is LED lighting. LEDs, or light-emitting diodes, convert electrons to photons and use 90 percent less energy to emit the same amount of light as an incandescent bulb. In addition, LEDs have an extremely long life—27 years if turned on five hours per day. It is assumed that LEDs will become standard by 2050, replacing less-efficient bulbs and avoiding 7.8 gigatons and 5 gigatons of carbon in households and commercial buildings, respectively. LED lighting exists across the Wake Forest campus. According to Shenette, there are upwards of 1,000 LED fixtures both indoors and out.

From full renovation of residence halls on the upper quad to routine replacement of ordinary appliances, Drawdown solution number 80, retrofitting, is highly visible across campus. Retrofitting—updating existing buildings by installing better insulation, more energy-efficient features in the “envelope” like windows and roofs, and upgraded management systems—is taking place all around campus. “A great example of retrofitting is the Reynolds Gym,” says Shenette. “Rather than creating a brand-new building, we converted the bones of the original gym, revamped and reengineered everything with more efficient structural, electrical, and mechanical infrastructure. The same thing is also happening right now with the Salem Hall renovation. It’s incredibly innovative.”

Want to learn more about how you can play a part in Project Drawdown to reduce GHG emissions? Join us for a public lecture by Dr. Katharine Wilkinson, the senior writer of Drawdown, on October 5 in the Byrum Welcome Center starting at 6:00 pm. RSVP here.

Leading the Way Toward Carbon Reduction through Campus-Wide Initiatives

October 3rd, 2017

  • Reduced food waste (3)
  • Plant-rich diet (4)
  • Regenerative agriculture (11)
  • Electric vehicles (26)
  • Mass transit (37)
  • Household recycling (55)
  • Bike infrastructure (59)
  • Composting (60)
  • Ride sharing (75)

FOOD

Do you know the environmental impact of the food you eat? You may be surprised to see that the adoption of a plant-rich diet is solution number four, but it’s true– overconsumption of animal protein not only comes at a high cost to human health, but it is also detrimental to our global climate. Even the most conservative estimates blame animal husbandry for nearly 15 percent of greenhouse gases (GHGs) emitted each year. Food waste is an even bigger problem. Did you know that a third of the food raised or prepared each year does not even make it to your plate? If more people adopted plant-rich diets, composted organic matter, and reduced food waste by 50 percent, we could draw carbon emissions down by 70.53 gigatons by the year 2050.

A portion of the offerings provided by the vegan station.

Wake Forest Dining is making strides to support diets that are high in fruits, vegetables, and plant-based proteins. According to Wake Forest’s registered dietician/nutritionist, Brooke Orr, “Deacon Dining aims to educate students and provide a variety of plant-based diet options across campus.” Current options include: vegetarian/vegan options at catered events, the vegan station at the Fresh Food Company, the Performance Dining Station at the Fresh Food Company—which offers a variety of vegetables and plant based protein options daily, and the Performance Dining education program—which encourages students to make half of their plate vegetables and half of their protein choices a plant protein.

Campus Kitchen at Wake Forest has been working to reduce food waste for many years. This student-led initiative repurposes food that is prepared, but not served, into meals that are distributed through community partner agencies in Winston-Salem. The group also gleans food from high-end grocers in town. More than 500 pounds of high quality food, which no longer meets the store managers’ standards, is redirected daily to individuals and families suffering from food insecurity.

Campus Kitchen at Wake Forest repurposes food that is prepared, but not served, into meals that are distributed through community partner agencies in Winston-Salem.

According to John Wise, the Associate Vice President of WFU Hospitality & Auxiliary Services, our campus has also taken substantial steps to divert food waste from the landfill. The North Dining Hall was specifically designed to minimize waste. Both pre-and post-consumer food waste are sent to Gallins Family Farm to be converted into nutrient-rich compost. In the Pit, all pre-consumer waste from food prep is sent to Gallins Family Farm to be composted. Additionally, all coffee grounds from the national brand outlet and student-run enterprise on campus are diverted and composted.

Wake Forest is also working to demonstrate regenerative agriculture in the Campus Garden. Regenerative agriculture restores degraded land through no-tillage practices, diverse cover-cropping, in-farm fertility (no requirement of external nutrients), no pesticides/synthetic fertilizers, and multiple crop rotations between plots. The purpose of these methods is to help restore soil health by improving its carbon content. If regenerative agriculture acres increase from 108 million to 1 billion by 2050, carbon emissions could be reduced by nearly 23.2 gigatons.

MATERIALS

In addition to reducing the impacts of agricultural practices, Wake Forest promotes solid waste reduction and recycling. On average, 50 percent of recycled materials globally come from households, while the other 50 percent come from industrial and commercial sectors. The university is working to educate students, faculty, and staff about the economics behind consumer recycling while focusing on diverting major material streams like furniture, yard waste, and construction and demolition waste.

TRANSPORT

Another key set of initiatives on campus center on transportation. The implementation of bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure is a great pathway for reducing carbon emissions; easy access to bicycles, as well as the placement of a safe and effective riding environment, could work to increase global bike trips from 5.5 to 7.5 percent, and avoid 2.3 gigatons of CO2 emissions. Check out Re-Cycle, our bike sharing program, which allows students, faculty, and staff to borrow bikes for up to an entire semester. Additionally, Wake Forest administrators are in collaboration with City of Winston-Salem staff to implement recommendations for improving infrastructure to and from campus.

The WFU Re-Cycle Program allows students, faculty, and staff to borrow bikes for up to an entire semester.

If biking isn’t your thing, there are other sustainable transportation options. Mass transit currently makes up 37 percent of urban travel. If usage grows to 40 percent by 2050, we could save nearly 6.6 gigatons of emissions from individual cars. Similarly, ride sharing is free to implement and can also result in a significant reduction of GHGs.

In the realm of transit, Wake Forest’s transportation manager, Arian Bryant, supports “a fleet of 11 shuttles, which regularly run from the main campus to WFU satellite locations, as well as to a number of hotspots in the Winston-Salem community. We have recently redesigned our routes to make them more efficient and user friendly, and are now utilizing TransLoc, a GPS tracking service which shows the user bus routes and schedules.” If you need to travel somewhere beyond the shuttle routes, there are five Zipcars on the Reynolda campus and one at Wake Downtown. Additionally, Wake Forest partners with ShareTheRideNC, a ride-matching and ride-sharing service sponsored by the North Carolina Department of Transportation (NCDOT) and the Piedmont Authority for Regional Transportation (PART). This service allows WFU students, faculty, and staff to share a ride with anyone across ShareTheRide’s network of 30+ companies and universities.

One of the electric vehicle charging stations on the WFU Reynolda campus.

Bryant also highlighted Wake Forest’s use of electric vehicles (EVs); many of the vehicles in the fleets used by campus maintenance personnel are EVs. Additionally, WFU’s Transportation and Parking Services is in the process of upgrading all parking enforcement vehicles to EVs. The campus also has a number of charging stations which are free for use by students, faculty, staff, and campus visitors. But what is the environmental benefit of transitioning away from internal combustion engines? If ownership and use of EVs rises to 16 percent of passenger miles driven by 2050, 10.8 gigatons of carbon dioxide emissions could be avoided. With innovation on the rise, it seems that EVs will be among the cars of the future.

Want to learn more about how you can play a part in Project Drawdown and campus initiatives to reduce GHG emissions? Join us for a public lecture by Dr. Katharine Wilkinson, the senior writer of Drawdown, on October 5 in the Byrum Welcome Center starting at 6:00 pm. RSVP here.

Forward Focused: Research for a Cooler Climate and Brighter Future

September 27th, 2017

In this piece, we examine six Drawdown solutions where Wake Forest researchers and scholars are actively making strides. These solutions, and their corresponding ranks, include:

  • Tropical forests (5)
  • Forest protection (38)
  • Coastal wetlands (52)
  • Smart glass (61)
  • Biochar (72)
  • Pope Francis (Not part of the 80 solutions, but featured under “Coming Attractions”)

To effectively draw down carbon and reduce our climate impact, the conservation of old-growth forests and tropical forest preservation is vital. Tropical forests are an important focus, ranking fifth on the Drawdown list of solutions—their loss alone is responsible for 16-19 percent of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from human activity. The good news is that these forests are extremely resilient; with restoration and rehabilitation, they can recover 90 percent of the biomass of old-growth forests within a median of 66 years. This recovery is beneficial in that it takes carbon from the atmosphere and places it back into plants and soil. If humanity takes action, we could reduce CO2 output by 61.2 gigatons by 2050.

ake Forest biologist Miles Silman in the cloud forest.

Wake Forest Center for Energy, Environment, and Sustainability (CEES) researcher Dr. Miles Silman dedicates much of his time to studying tropical forest ecosystem response. His primary interest is how nutrients in the forests—carbon, in particular—cycle between the soil, atmosphere, and living organisms. In his research, Silman has developed a methodology for assessing concentrations of carbon in forests—how much the organic matter stores or releases on a cyclical basis—and then applying this information to carbon offsetting projects and conservation.

Silman and another CEES researcher, Dr. Abdou Lachgar, are working closely with solution number 72—biochar. Known as terra preta—literally, “black earth” in Portuguese—biochar covers up to 10 percent of the Amazon basin. Silman and Lachgar work with modeling this dark earth—and produce it not only in the lab at Wake Forest, but in two areas of the lowland Amazonian tropics. Additionally, Silman and Lachgar monitor the effects of biochar on tropical agriculture and what it may mean for economic productivity in those areas.

CEES researchers are developing a new and more effective version of biochar made from native Amazonian bamboos.

Wake Forest faculty and students are also examining coastal wetlands and how humanity’s progression impacts these delicate ecosystems; these wetlands are enormous carbon sinks—protecting them will secure around 15 gigatons of carbon and prevent a 53 gigaton increase of GHGs in the atmosphere. Through partnerships with the Belizean government, Wake Forest students have had the opportunity to work with the Belize Coastal Zone Management Authority and Institute to help ensure the coasts remain healthy. Additional information about CEES in Belize can be found on the Center’s website.

Wake Forest physics professor David Carroll.

David Carroll, WFU professor of Physics and Director of the Center for Nanotechnology and Molecular Materials, is researching the electrochromic responses that enable solution 61, smart glass. Smart glass has the ability to account for changes in light and weather and can improve the energy efficiency of buildings. If smart glass is implemented in 29 percent of commercial buildings by 2050, emissions from energy use would be reduced by 2.2 gigatons.

Though not part of the 80 solutions, but mentioned as a coming attraction is Laudato Si, Pope Francis’ encyclical “On Care for Our Common Home.” The book describes Laudato Si as a work that lifts away jargon and brings the scientific issue of global warming down to a personal, “fully human” dimension.

WFU Journalism Professor Justin Catanoso has researched the letter extensively, and agrees that it is a “beautifully written document, put together by an interdisciplinary team of experts from around the world, which is accessible to anyone who wants to read it.” When asked to describe the biggest takeaway, Catanoso notes that the Pope derides our “throwaway society” highlighting how we continue to plunder our exhaustible resources instead of reusing what we already have. The Pope’s main point, then, is that humanity—no matter what religion you follow, or if you follow none—needs to realize that we are not dominions of the earth, but rather stewards.

“We are here for only a short amount of time,” Catanoso said, “and we’ve already used more than our fair share. Laudato Si is a moving document. It scares people, as it should. We need to be shocked. The Pope is calling us all into action.”

Will you answer that call? Learn more about how you can play a part in Project Drawdown and reduce your climate footprint at 6:00 pm on Thursday, October 5, in the Byrum Welcome Center. Dr. Katharine Wilkinson, the senior writer of Drawdown, will be giving a public lecture on the 80 global solutions for reducing greenhouse gas emissions.  RSVP here.

Keynote and Dialogue with Drawdown Senior Writer, Katharine Wilkinson

September 20th, 2017

The event will begin at 6 p.m. on Thursday, October 5, in the Byrum Welcome Center. Doors open at 5:30. Admission is free and seats are limited. RSVP here.

Project Drawdown: Your Comprehensive Guide to Carbon Reduction and Climate Protection

September 13th, 2017

Introducing Project Drawdown, the “most comprehensive plan ever proposed to reverse global warming.” Carefully constructed by 200 researchers and scientists drawn from a network of world-renowned institutions, the project and its resulting book, Drawdown, provide a roadmap to drawing down greenhouse gas emissions through 80 of the most impactful climate solutions available today.

Of the techniques and practices, there are some that are well known—wind energy, green roofing, food waste reduction, forest protection—as well as others you may have not yet heard of— in-stream hydro, perennial biomass, alternative cement, and peatlands. For each solution presented, the book meticulously projects potential emission reductions by the year 2050, along with the estimated cost of implementation and the resultant savings.  Together, the solutions prove that we can draw down greenhouse gas emissions in order to slow the rate of climate change. As project director Paul Hawken explains in the book’s introduction, we are not victims of “a fate that was determined by actions that precede us…We [must] take 100 percent responsibility and stop blaming others. We see global warming not as an inevitability but as an invitation to build, innovate, and effect change, a pathway that awakens creativity, compassion, and genius.”

Here at Wake Forest, faculty, staff, and students are already invested in 25 of the practices addressed in the book, five of which are included within the top 10 ranking of greatest impact. A handful of professors have recently incorporated Drawdown in their courses and professional workshops.  Law professor Alan Palmiter, for example, has coupled the book with his Energy Law course, as he feels that it provides a clear and compelling background for underscoring why the program is important. He describes the book as “the greatest recipe book of all time,” because it “describes the ingredients, the measures, and even the temperature at which we should cook what [may] be humanity’s redeeming meal.”

According to Wake Forest’s Chief Sustainability Officer, Dedee DeLongpré Johnston, “so far students have appreciated Drawdown as a very practical guide to global solutions. As emerging leaders who are trained to think across disciplinary boundaries, they can leverage what they’re learning in religion, psychology, philosophy, entrepreneurship, and policy to create new societal norms. Our campus serves as a living laboratory for implementing the book’s practices; if students can practically experience change here, they can lead it anywhere.”

In the coming weeks, this series of articles will explore how Wake Forest is currently deploying, demonstrating, and researching 25 of the 80 proposed Drawdown solutions. More specifically, we will explore these solutions as they relate to the built environment, research, and campus-led initiatives.

On Thursday, October 5th, Dr. Katharine Wilkinson, the senior writer of Drawdown, will give a public lecture at the Byrum Welcome Center at 6:00pm. Don’t miss the opportunity to hear Dr. Wilkinson speak on the 80 global solutions for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and to learn what you can do at home to play your part in Project Drawdown.

Wake Forest to Adopt New Ride-Sharing Service

August 29th, 2017

To continue your commitment to ride-sharing at Wake Forest, register with ShareTheRideNC and select Wake Forest University as your primary affiliation. Remember, registering does not obligate you to carpool, but we do hope it motivates you!

This quick walk-through video explains how to register and start finding matches on STRNC.org.

Features of ShareTheRideNC

  • Safe and secure: By default, people who match with your commute will see your first name, commute preferences, and the contact information you choose to share. You can also opt to hide all information and not appear on others’ match lists by changing your personal settings.
  • More opportunities to match: WFU employees and students may choose to only match with members of the WFU community or expand their matches to others across the state of North Carolina.
  • No obligations: There are no obligations or requirements when registering for ShareTheRideNC. You choose the people you’d like to contact and those with whom you would be interested carpooling/vanpooling.
  • Incentives: Earn points each time you use a form of alternative transportation to win giftcards and other prizes.
  • In case of emergency: If you have an emergency and need to leave at a different time than your carpool partner, you can utilize the Emergency Ride Home (ERH) program, which provides a taxicab or rental car to get you home, free of cost.

Hacks for an Eco-Friendly Move

July 25th, 2017

  1. Pack clothes, shoes, and sheets in re-usable plastic crates or even pillow cases.
  2. Wrap picture frames and other breakables in T-shirts, or towels. Sandwich larger items like framed posters between pillows, blankets or comforters.
  3. Pack school supplies in re-usable file crates with handles. The crates will come in handy for organizing schoolwork throughout the semester.
  4. Contact roommates before packing to avoid unnecessary duplicates like area rugs, tool kits, televisions or toaster ovens.
  5. Put toiletries in sturdy-handled shower baskets and re-usable zip-top bags, all of which can fit neatly into a laundry basket.
  6. Recycle any boxes you do bring on move-in day, especially new product cartons and packaging, by taking them to a designated collection site. Most campuses recycle cardboard, and some collect Styrofoam packaging.
  7. Remember to pack enough re-usable water bottles for everyone helping with the move. Move-in day is usually among the hottest of the year.

Campus Tree Update: Willow Oak Removal

July 21st, 2017