Wake Forest University

Transportation - Sustainability at Wake Forest

Sustainability at Wake Forest

Transportation

Transportation

Biking and Walking

The Wake Forest Reynolda Campus connects to a number of restaurants, museums, and facilities that are accessible by biking or walking. WFU is also frequently assessing infrastructure to increase connectivity on campus and with the surrounding Winston-Salem community.

 

SharetheRideNC

On September 30, 2017, Wake Forest University will be making the transition from Zimride to ShareTheRideNC. ShareTheRideNC is a statewide ride-matching service sponsored by the North Carolina Department of Transportation (NCDOT) and the Piedmont Authority for Regional Transportation (PART).
To continue your commitment to ride-sharing at Wake Forest, register with ShareTheRideNC and select Wake Forest University as your primary affiliation. Remember, registering does not obligate you to carpool, but we do hope it motivates you! This quick walk-through video explains how to register and start finding matches on STRNC.org.

Zipcar

Wake Forest offers a car-sharing program as an alternative to bringing your own car to campus. Zipcars are an affordable option that are available by the hour or by the day. During the academic year, cars are parked on campus near the first-year residence halls, between Kitchin and Poteat Halls, and by Polo Hall. They are available 24-hours-a-day; rates include gas and insurance. For more information or to join the network, visit www.zipcar.com/wfu.

Shuttles

Wake Forest offers several shuttles to meet the transportation needs of various campus groups. The Gold and Black shuttle lines serve the commuting needs of the approximately 400 undergraduate and graduate students who live in apartment complexes within two miles of campus. Two off-campus apartment loops are completed on regularly-scheduled intervals throughout the academic day. Printable schedules and route maps are available on the Ride the Wake page. The Gray Line shuttle serves faculty and staff working in the Deacon Blvd area and all members of the campus community who travel between Student Drive, the campus core, and the Deacon Blvd area.

Carpool

Carpooling saves money, gas, and time looking for a parking space. Faculty and staff members can register a carpool and receive a free, reserved space by filling out the carpool application. Complete the application and return it to Transportation and Parking Services via email (parking@wfu.edu), fax (ext. 6150) or campus mail. Be sure to review the carpool program procedures and policy. If you’re worried about needing to run an errand off campus, Zipcars are available by the hour. Not sure how to find a carpool partner? Read our guide How to Find and Register a Carpool, which includes a number of frequently asked questions about carpooling.

Electric Vehicle Charging Stations

A charging station for electric vehicles is located on Gulley Drive immediately behind Tribble Hall, next to Manchester Plaza.  It can accommodate the charging of two vehicles at a time.  Charging a vehicle is free with a three-hour limit.

The charging station is locked, but can be activated in various ways:

–Call 888-758-4389 (24/7 ChargePoint Driver Support).

–Download and use the ChargePoint mobile app.

–Contact the Transportation and Parking Office to obtain a ChargePoint activation card on weekdays between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.  Call 336-758-PARK (4255).

–Call Transportation and Parking during business hours.

–After business hours on weekdays and weekends, contact 336-758-4255 (Leave a brief message for an immediate return call).

ReCycle End of Semester Bike Return

November 28th, 2017
Calling all ReCycle bikeshare participants! Your bike is in need of some TLC over winter break. Use this form to sign up for a time slot between December 4 – 6 to return your bike to Outdoor Pursuits (located in the Sutton Center). Please note that bikes will be distributed back to participants at the beginning of the spring semester.

Parking and Transportation Now Transportation and Parking Services

November 8th, 2017

“In the past year, we have increased our fleet of shuttles from six vehicles to eleven,” says Bryant. In doing so, the department hopes to generate more effective and reliable transport to WFU satellite locations and Winston-Salem hotspots. Bryant also notes that the means of tracking shuttles has been updated for convenience and efficiency. “We are proud to have added the Transloc GPS system, which provides users with real-time access to bus routes and schedules.”

In terms of traveling beyond the vicinity of Winston-Salem, Transportation and Parking Services has partnered with the Piedmont Authority for Regional Transportation (PART) to increase the accessibility of carpooling and vanpooling options. Using the ride-matching service ShareTheRideNC, the Wake Forest population has access to a network of over 30 different companies and universities from which they can safely find a carpool partner(s).

Bryant shares that there are more exciting updates to come. “We are looking to add airport shuttle services to the mix by spring 2018, among other future services. All of our new changes and improvements are not only intended to give the Wake community more options for getting where they need to go, but also to increase our commitment to sustainability.”

The offerings complement university-wide programs that support alternatives to SOV or single-occupancy-vehicle travel (one driver in one car). Zipcar offers car sharing to those who choose not to bring vehicles onto campus but who still need access to a vehicle for unique trips. Additionally, the bike sharing program, Re-Cycle, offers a two-wheeled option by the hour or by the semester.

“Although some individuals would like to drive every inch of their routes and park at the front door of their destinations, this isn’t a realistic expectation in a changing world,” adds Dedee DeLongpré Johnston, the university’s chief sustainability officer. “Our students will graduate and enter a world of changing transportation infrastructure. For those who live and work in metropolitan areas, alternatives to SOV travel are the norm.”

To discover more about the department’s alternative transportation solutions, as well as transportation-related offerings, like electric vehicle charging stations, visit their website.

Leading the Way Toward Carbon Reduction through Campus-Wide Initiatives

October 3rd, 2017

  • Reduced food waste (3)
  • Plant-rich diet (4)
  • Regenerative agriculture (11)
  • Electric vehicles (26)
  • Mass transit (37)
  • Household recycling (55)
  • Bike infrastructure (59)
  • Composting (60)
  • Ride sharing (75)

FOOD

Do you know the environmental impact of the food you eat? You may be surprised to see that the adoption of a plant-rich diet is solution number four, but it’s true– overconsumption of animal protein not only comes at a high cost to human health, but it is also detrimental to our global climate. Even the most conservative estimates blame animal husbandry for nearly 15 percent of greenhouse gases (GHGs) emitted each year. Food waste is an even bigger problem. Did you know that a third of the food raised or prepared each year does not even make it to your plate? If more people adopted plant-rich diets, composted organic matter, and reduced food waste by 50 percent, we could draw carbon emissions down by 70.53 gigatons by the year 2050.

A portion of the offerings provided by the vegan station.

Wake Forest Dining is making strides to support diets that are high in fruits, vegetables, and plant-based proteins. According to Wake Forest’s registered dietician/nutritionist, Brooke Orr, “Deacon Dining aims to educate students and provide a variety of plant-based diet options across campus.” Current options include: vegetarian/vegan options at catered events, the vegan station at the Fresh Food Company, the Performance Dining Station at the Fresh Food Company—which offers a variety of vegetables and plant based protein options daily, and the Performance Dining education program—which encourages students to make half of their plate vegetables and half of their protein choices a plant protein.

Campus Kitchen at Wake Forest has been working to reduce food waste for many years. This student-led initiative repurposes food that is prepared, but not served, into meals that are distributed through community partner agencies in Winston-Salem. The group also gleans food from high-end grocers in town. More than 500 pounds of high quality food, which no longer meets the store managers’ standards, is redirected daily to individuals and families suffering from food insecurity.

Campus Kitchen at Wake Forest repurposes food that is prepared, but not served, into meals that are distributed through community partner agencies in Winston-Salem.

According to John Wise, the Associate Vice President of WFU Hospitality & Auxiliary Services, our campus has also taken substantial steps to divert food waste from the landfill. The North Dining Hall was specifically designed to minimize waste. Both pre-and post-consumer food waste are sent to Gallins Family Farm to be converted into nutrient-rich compost. In the Pit, all pre-consumer waste from food prep is sent to Gallins Family Farm to be composted. Additionally, all coffee grounds from the national brand outlet and student-run enterprise on campus are diverted and composted.

Wake Forest is also working to demonstrate regenerative agriculture in the Campus Garden. Regenerative agriculture restores degraded land through no-tillage practices, diverse cover-cropping, in-farm fertility (no requirement of external nutrients), no pesticides/synthetic fertilizers, and multiple crop rotations between plots. The purpose of these methods is to help restore soil health by improving its carbon content. If regenerative agriculture acres increase from 108 million to 1 billion by 2050, carbon emissions could be reduced by nearly 23.2 gigatons.

MATERIALS

In addition to reducing the impacts of agricultural practices, Wake Forest promotes solid waste reduction and recycling. On average, 50 percent of recycled materials globally come from households, while the other 50 percent come from industrial and commercial sectors. The university is working to educate students, faculty, and staff about the economics behind consumer recycling while focusing on diverting major material streams like furniture, yard waste, and construction and demolition waste.

TRANSPORT

Another key set of initiatives on campus center on transportation. The implementation of bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure is a great pathway for reducing carbon emissions; easy access to bicycles, as well as the placement of a safe and effective riding environment, could work to increase global bike trips from 5.5 to 7.5 percent, and avoid 2.3 gigatons of CO2 emissions. Check out Re-Cycle, our bike sharing program, which allows students, faculty, and staff to borrow bikes for up to an entire semester. Additionally, Wake Forest administrators are in collaboration with City of Winston-Salem staff to implement recommendations for improving infrastructure to and from campus.

The WFU Re-Cycle Program allows students, faculty, and staff to borrow bikes for up to an entire semester.

If biking isn’t your thing, there are other sustainable transportation options. Mass transit currently makes up 37 percent of urban travel. If usage grows to 40 percent by 2050, we could save nearly 6.6 gigatons of emissions from individual cars. Similarly, ride sharing is free to implement and can also result in a significant reduction of GHGs.

In the realm of transit, Wake Forest’s transportation manager, Arian Bryant, supports “a fleet of 11 shuttles, which regularly run from the main campus to WFU satellite locations, as well as to a number of hotspots in the Winston-Salem community. We have recently redesigned our routes to make them more efficient and user friendly, and are now utilizing TransLoc, a GPS tracking service which shows the user bus routes and schedules.” If you need to travel somewhere beyond the shuttle routes, there are five Zipcars on the Reynolda campus and one at Wake Downtown. Additionally, Wake Forest partners with ShareTheRideNC, a ride-matching and ride-sharing service sponsored by the North Carolina Department of Transportation (NCDOT) and the Piedmont Authority for Regional Transportation (PART). This service allows WFU students, faculty, and staff to share a ride with anyone across ShareTheRide’s network of 30+ companies and universities.

One of the electric vehicle charging stations on the WFU Reynolda campus.

Bryant also highlighted Wake Forest’s use of electric vehicles (EVs); many of the vehicles in the fleets used by campus maintenance personnel are EVs. Additionally, WFU’s Transportation and Parking Services is in the process of upgrading all parking enforcement vehicles to EVs. The campus also has a number of charging stations which are free for use by students, faculty, staff, and campus visitors. But what is the environmental benefit of transitioning away from internal combustion engines? If ownership and use of EVs rises to 16 percent of passenger miles driven by 2050, 10.8 gigatons of carbon dioxide emissions could be avoided. With innovation on the rise, it seems that EVs will be among the cars of the future.

Want to learn more about how you can play a part in Project Drawdown and campus initiatives to reduce GHG emissions? Join us for a public lecture by Dr. Katharine Wilkinson, the senior writer of Drawdown, on October 5 in the Byrum Welcome Center starting at 6:00 pm. RSVP here.

Wake Forest to Adopt New Ride-Sharing Service

August 29th, 2017

To continue your commitment to ride-sharing at Wake Forest, register with ShareTheRideNC and select Wake Forest University as your primary affiliation. Remember, registering does not obligate you to carpool, but we do hope it motivates you!

This quick walk-through video explains how to register and start finding matches on STRNC.org.

Features of ShareTheRideNC

  • Safe and secure: By default, people who match with your commute will see your first name, commute preferences, and the contact information you choose to share. You can also opt to hide all information and not appear on others’ match lists by changing your personal settings.
  • More opportunities to match: WFU employees and students may choose to only match with members of the WFU community or expand their matches to others across the state of North Carolina.
  • No obligations: There are no obligations or requirements when registering for ShareTheRideNC. You choose the people you’d like to contact and those with whom you would be interested carpooling/vanpooling.
  • Incentives: Earn points each time you use a form of alternative transportation to win giftcards and other prizes.
  • In case of emergency: If you have an emergency and need to leave at a different time than your carpool partner, you can utilize the Emergency Ride Home (ERH) program, which provides a taxicab or rental car to get you home, free of cost.

FAQ: Zagster Bike Share

June 26th, 2017
Q: I saw that the National Cycling Center and the City of Winston Salem installed several Zagster bike share stations around town. How can I participate?

A: If you haven’t already, download the Zagster app and join the Winston-Salem, NC bike share. The app will help guide you through the following steps:
  1. BORROW: Get out your phone and open the Zagster app. Login and then enter the bike number in the “RIDE” screen. Tap the “START RIDE” button to start your ride. The app will show you the “CODE” number for the bike you’ve borrowed.
  2. UNLOCK: Enter the code into the bike’s lockbox, which is the box with a keypad on the rack of the bike. Press “ENT”, enter the code, then press “ENT” again. Make sure to press each button slowly and firmly.
  3. The box will flash the “MESSAGE” and “READY” lights once you’ve entered your code correctly. Pull the lockbox lid up and pull out the key inside. Use the key to operate the U-lock that attaches the bike to its station. Close the lockbox before you ride.
  4. RIDE: Have fun and stay safe! Use the U-lock to keep the bike secure if you make stops along the way. You must always lock the bike to a fixed object if you leave the bike during your ride. The lockbox lid must always be closed unless you are using the key inside. Your lockbox code will continue to work throughout your ride.
  5. RETURN: When you’re done, lock the bike back to a Zagster station and close the lockbox. Then go to the app and tap “END RIDE”.

Students Overlook Campus Ride-Sharing Network

April 15th, 2017

Zimride, a ride-sharing network, was introduced to Wake Forests’ campus in 2012 as a way to encourage students, faculty and staff to protect the environment and save money. It works to connect drivers and riders who are headed in the same direction through its website or Facebook page.

This ride-sharing network requires a registered Wake Forest email address to sign up. Zimride is economical because it allows drivers to save up to 75 percent on travel costs by splitting a ride with three passengers. Most importantly, the act of carpooling has a major impact on the overall reduction of car pollution, ultimately protecting our environment.

“Since its inception in 2012, we’ve had over 1,100 users and over 1,100 individual rides posted,” said Brian Cohen, the program coordinator for the Office of Sustainability, “That being said, it is undeniable that many people have still not heard of Zimride.”

“I assume that students are unaware of Zimride because they aren’t looking for a ride matching platform,” said Dedee Johnston, the chief sustainability officer. “Sometimes we don’t see things that are clear in sight because we’re not looking for them.”

This idea of not looking for a carpooling network stems from the lack of knowledge regarding its influence on the environment, thus contributing to the refusal to participate in it. 

Sara Cecere, a Greeks Go Green representative, carried out research on the creation of this ride-sharing system.

“In terms of Zimride, only 2.56 percent of those who responded used it or another carpooling app,” she said.  “We found that the biggest barrier to carpooling was that an overwhelming majority (85.71 percent) felt it was inconvenient to coordinate with other people.”

In addition to this, Cecere said that only 2.59 percent of students reported that they believed carpooling reduces carbon dioxide emissions.

This information illustrates the discouraging fact that most people on campus are uninformed about the impact that humans have on our surroundings. In reality, every ride-share works to take away four cars from the road, which is equal to planting about 4,000 trees, according to the Mother Nature Network.

A once-a-week switch to carpooling can decrease a drivers’ carbon footprint by 20 percent.

Considering today’s political climate, our understanding of this data is more important than ever.

On March 28, President Donald Trump signed an executive order to roll back former President Barack Obama’s six-year effort to reduce the effects of climate change and manage carbon emissions. 

Trump believed that Obama’s restrictions on power plants and coal mines only worked to hurt American workers. As a result, he eliminated many government regulations on environmental protection.

While this executive order does not directly pull the U.S. out of the Paris agreement, which commits 196 nations to reducing its carbon footprint to decrease global warming, it puts less pressure on individuals, businesses and the country to accomplish this goal.

This is why awareness is imperative.

“I think if students were more exposed to learning about the impact that they have on the environment, like driving in a car, the more likely they would be to use a system like Zimride,” said junior Mariweir Harris.

There is hope for the future.

“Our Greeks Go Green representatives have also been promoting it within their sororities and fraternities,” Cohen said. “We’ve seen a gradual increase in users, especially before breaks.”

After learning about the ride-sharing network, sophomore, Mitch Dyer, said, “I had no idea [Zimride] existed. If I had known, I would have definitely used it.

“That’s why I believe this is the type of thing that will take off once it becomes a norm on campus,” Cohen said. “But we really need the help of other organizations in reaching more people.”

Originally published in the Old Gold and Black.

Meet Wake Forest’s Newest Human-Powered Parking Enforcement Officer

April 28th, 2016

kathy_kullman_wfu_sustainabilityWake Forest University’s newest parking enforcement officer, Kathy Kullman, exudes an overall friendly and approachable demeanor. It’s not her appearance or her personality that sets her apart from other parking attendants. The reason is not difficult to pinpoint: she’s human-powered.

Kullman has committed to biking throughout a significant portion of her workday. After previously working as a bicycle patrol officer for a school in California, it was a “no-brainer” when Alex Crist, Director of Transportation and Parking, asked about her preference on biking.

“Having a parking enforcement officer on bike is great for our campus,” says Crist. “We are saving money on fuel, reducing our carbon footprint, and providing an invaluable resource of increased accessibility to our campus community.”

Re-Cycle Bike Sharing Program Challenges Car Culture on Campus

March 17th, 2016

It was February 9, 2016 and the area in front of Benson University Center was filled with close to 100 bikes. In a matter of hours, all bikes had been reserved for semester-long use at no cost to students, faculty and staff.

Re-Cycle-Bike-SharingImplementing a free bike-sharing program on a college campus was no easy feat. But behind every successful initiative is an inspired change agent who made it happen—conducted surveys, did the research, identified the means, and converted inspiration to action. Alyshah Aziz, a Politics and International Affairs major from the class of 2016, was that person for Wake Forest University.

It began with CHARGE—WFU’s ten-week leadership development program for first and second-year students. In 2013, Aziz and her group members identified a problem with current modes of transportation in the campus community. Single occupancy vehicles impact roadways, air pollution, health and the greater environment. In an effort to encourage more sustainable transportation modes, they proposed a bike-sharing program for students, faculty and staff. However, when they presented this idea to the WFU Office of Sustainability, they discovered it wasn’t the first time such a program had been proposed. The problem had been implementing the idea. Was there sufficient demand for this program? How would it be funded? Who would manage it?
The ten-week CHARGE program came and went, but Aziz’ passion remained ignited. She applied for a unique internship with the Office of Sustainability to continue the investigation and was accepted. Her initial work included a robust study of demand on campus, including evaluation of price sensitivity among potential user groups.

The tipping point that led to the initiation of the program was the discovery that more than a hundred bikes were abandoned on campus every summer. The organization that had been the recipient of the abandoned property in the past could not use any more bikes. With one solution to two problems in hand, Aziz engaged a variety of other campus offices and organizations to initiate a plan. She partnered with the WFU Cycling Team, Outdoor Pursuits, and University Police to collect and restore 65 usable bicycles that were abandoned on the WFU campus following the 2015 spring semester.

August 2015 marked the pilot program for Re-Cycle, named for the re-use of bicycles that were previously abandoned. To meet unmet demand from the first semester, the Office of Sustainability, WFU Student Activities Fund and the Office of Wellbeing provided financial support to purchase 45 new bikes for the spring semester program. As of February 2016, all bikes had been reserved and over 200 individuals had expressed interest in the program since its pilot.

All WFU students, faculty and staff are eligible to participate in the Re-Cycle bike-sharing program, and there is no cost to borrow a bike. Individuals may reserve a bike for semester-long or short-term use at Outdoor Pursuits. The wait-list for semester-long rentals continues to grow as the program gains popularity. Aside from enabling a free and more sustainable alternative to driving, Re-Cycle also supports the physical well-being of the campus community.

“I hope this program inspires students, faculty and staff to think differently about the way they get from one location to the next,” says Aziz, who will graduate this May. “It’s not easy to influence car culture, and the Re-Cycle bike-sharing program is an important milestone in doing just that.”

In reflecting on the successful launch of this initiative, Dedee DeLongpre Johnston, the campus Chief Sustainability Officer, offered “It’s difficult to estimate how many students come to us each year with ‘good ideas.’ It’s far easier to count those who bring their ideas to fruition. Alyshah’s commitment to execution and professionalism in everything she does is inspiring.”

FAQ: Carpooling to a Meeting

July 10th, 2014

Q: Some members of our department are attending a meeting off campus. We think others from Wake Forest might also be attending, but we’re not sure how to connect with them. Is there a way to do that online?

A: Absolutely. Whether you are driving to a meeting, a regional conference, or just an office lunch, you can always offer/seek a ride through Zimride. If you are attending a regional conference and have colleagues from the area attending, you can post a ride that is open to our members in trusted partner network: University of Virginia, Appalachian State University, University of Richmond, UNC Chapel Hill, and NC State University.

Read more frequently asked questions about carpooling on our how to guide, How to Find and Register a Carpool.

FAQ: Carpool Emergency Ride

July 10th, 2014

Photo courtesy of zimride.com

Photo courtesy of zimride.com

A: Yes. In the case of a personal or family emergency, the Transportation and Parking Office will reimburse a carpool member for cab fare upon submission of a valid receipt. In the case of scheduled appointments or other driving needs during the workday, carpool members are encouraged to maintain a membership in Zipcar. Any of the five vehicles in the WFU shared fleet can be reserved and used as needed at a low hourly rate that includes gas and insurance.

Read more frequently asked questions about carpooling on our how to guide, How to Find and Register a Carpool.