Wake Forest University

Campus Garden Archives - Sustainability at Wake Forest

Sustainability at Wake Forest

Posts Tagged ‘Campus Garden’

WFU Campus Garden Volunteer Hours

Tuesday, August 18th, 2015

Volunteers participate in the entire Campus Garden operation: planting, cultivating, harvesting, and, most importantly, bringing fresh produce home to eat.  Students, staff, faculty, and families are welcome.  No gardening experience required; close-toed shoes and reusable water bottle recommended.

WFU Campus Garden Volunteer Hours

Tuesday, August 11th, 2015

Volunteers participate in the entire Campus Garden operation: planting, cultivating, harvesting, and, most importantly, bringing fresh produce home to eat.  Students, staff, faculty, and families are welcome.  No gardening experience required; close-toed shoes and reusable water bottle recommended.

WFU Campus Garden Volunteer Hours

Tuesday, August 4th, 2015

Volunteers participate in the entire Campus Garden operation: planting, cultivating, harvesting, and, most importantly, bringing fresh produce home to eat.  Students, staff, faculty, and families are welcome.  No gardening experience required; close-toed shoes and reusable water bottle recommended.

WFU Campus Garden Volunteer Hours

Tuesday, July 28th, 2015

Volunteers participate in the entire Campus Garden operation: planting, cultivating, harvesting, and, most importantly, bringing fresh produce home to eat.  Students, staff, faculty, and families are welcome.  No gardening experience required; close-toed shoes and reusable water bottle recommended.

WFU Campus Garden Volunteer Hours

Tuesday, June 2nd, 2015

Volunteers participate in the entire Campus Garden operation: planting, cultivating, harvesting, and, most importantly, bringing fresh produce home to eat.  Students, staff, faculty, and families are welcome.  No gardening experience required; close-toed shoes and reusable water bottle recommended.

Polo Pumpkin Party

Thursday, October 30th, 2014

The WFU Campus Garden is hosting a fall celebration event with all things pumpkin and they want you to come! Whether you’re a regular volunteer or have yet to visit, you’re welcome to join the party. Offerings include pumpkin painting, pumpkin pie, and hot apple cider. The first 20 people to register here, are guaranteed their own pumpkin to take home.

Campus Garden Volunteer Hours

Sunday, June 22nd, 2014

Volunteers participate in the entire Campus Garden operation: planting, cultivating, harvesting, and, most importantly, bringing fresh produce home to eat.  Students, staff, faculty, and families are welcome.  No gardening experience required; close-toed shoes and reusable water bottle recommended.

Campus Garden Volunteer Hours

Thursday, June 19th, 2014

Volunteers participate in the entire Campus Garden operation: planting, cultivating, harvesting, and, most importantly, bringing fresh produce home to eat.  Students, staff, faculty, and families are welcome.  No gardening experience required; close-toed shoes and reusable water bottle recommended.

Campus Garden Volunteer Hours

Monday, June 16th, 2014

Volunteers participate in the entire Campus Garden operation: planting, cultivating, harvesting, and, most importantly, bringing fresh produce home to eat.  Students, staff, faculty, and families are welcome.  No gardening experience required; close-toed shoes and reusable water bottle recommended.

Where are they now: Emily Bachman

Monday, November 4th, 2013

Emily Bachman (’13) was a prominent contributor to Wake Forest’s sustainability efforts throughout her four years as a student. She served as the president of the Student Environmental Action Coalition (SEAC), a shift leader and summer intern for Campus Kitchen, a regular volunteer in the Campus Garden, an intern with ARAMARK, where she worked to support sustainability in dining, and a semester-long intern with the Winston-Salem Sustainability Resource Center. In addition to her ambitious extracurricular activities, she completed a major in history with a double minor in environmental studies and anthropology.

After graduating last spring, Bachman took some time to travel. She spent two weeks in Israel with Birthright (accompanied by former fellow sustainability intern Sanders McNair) and six weeks driving across the country exploring several cities and national parks along the way.

Post-excursion, Bachman landed in Brooklyn where she is serving as the AmeriCorps Volunteer & Special Projects Coordinator for Rebuilding Together NYC. Rebuilding Together NYC is the New York City affiliate of a national nonprofit that is located in over 200 cities across the country. They are a “safe and healthy housing” organization, serving low income, elderly, handicapped, and veteran homeowners. They focus on critical home repairs including accessibility modifications for the physically disabled, and rebuilding after Hurricane Sandy. Additionally, Rebuilding Together NYC focuses on energy efficiency upgrades and weatherization to lower energy consumption in homes. She is also working on an independent project incorporating sustainable landscape design, including rain barrels and native plantings, into the organization’s future projects to support stormwater retention.

In the coming years Bachman plans to attend graduate school for a degree in Sustainable Urban Design and Policy and to find a career that allows her to pursue “city planning through a sustainable lens.” She says that being able to see different cities and compare the strengths and weaknesses of their designs while traveling has helped further develop and affirm her aspirations.

She says that her liberal arts education fostered her passion for sustainability and prepared her for post-collegiate life. “It taught me to think critically and holistically. My liberal arts education allowed me to explore my interests from a variety of perspectives and to understand the many different causes and potential solutions to the social and environmental issues we face today.”

What inspires you to be sustainable?

For as long as I can remember, sustainability has mattered to me. I value human life and I do not like the idea of people suffering, now or in the future. I understand that the way human beings, especially in the western world, are living today will cause suffering in the future. Rather than wait for the consequences and begin to react when it is too late, we should work immediately and proactively to develop sustainable lifestyles.

What is the biggest issue facing our generation?

Apathy. It is so obvious that we are doing things so wrong and that we need to change, but because most people are not confronted with the impacts of their unsustainable lifestyles directly on a daily basis, they are apathetic. They don’t care and they continue with the status quo. Not enough people are passionate enough.

What is your number one tip for living sustainably?

Don’t buy what you don’t need – I try to remind myself of this constantly, especially now that I am on an AmeriCorps stipend.

By Andrea Becker (’16), Staff Writer